Cleveland Indians

This Week in Baseball Weather

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Cleveland.com

In a week of rain events and long delays in Atlanta, Chicago and Minneapolis, the most dramatic and spectacular developed in Cleveland Saturday night as thunder crashed the summer night and rain drops drummed steadily on Progressive Field.

Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor stepped to the plate in the bottom of the 10th inning with his team tied 1-1 with the visiting Toronto Blue Jays. As rain fell around him, Lindor sent a pitch soaring high and deep into the night, spinning through rain drops toward the Cleveland skyline. Four-hundred and thirty-eight feet later, the ball splashed into the right field bleachers where hundreds of Tribe fans, a few clad in rain gear, celebrated their team’s much-needed walk off win.

The scene was set in the top half of inning as thunder roared through downtown and around the ballpark, but the rain held off until two pitches into Lindor’s at bat.

“Believe it or not, my first reaction when it started raining was like ‘Oh, the ball is going to go nowhere now,’” Lindor said after the game. “Then I stepped out and thought if I hit it hard on the ground, it will go through. And it went up and it carried.'”

The game-winner was Lindor’s first-ever walk-off homer in the rain… OK, it was first ever walk-off home run, period.

The Reds and Marlins began their three-game series Friday night with an hour and 47-minute delayed start at Cincinnati’s Great American Ball Park. After things got going, Christian Yelich drove in two runs to help the Marlins to 3-1 win. It was the Reds’ fourth rain delay of the season.

Rain struck hard and fast in Chicago Wednesday night, leading to the game between the White Sox and Dodgers to be called after seven innings. It was as good as over anyway as the Dodgers held an eight-run lead at the time of the delay.

Umpires sent the players off the field and called for the tarp at 10:09 p.m. Chicago time with the Dodgers batting in the top of the eighth. Thirty-seven minutes later, the game was called at 10:46 p.m. with the ballpark mostly empty of spectators.

Los Angeles won 9-1 and went on to sweep the brief two-game series.

[Photo of White Sox head groundskeepers Roger Bossard covering the field in the eighth inning as rain began to fall.]

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Atlanta Braves Twitter

If there was moaning coming from SunTrust Park early Monday evening, it wasn’t the usual incessant sound coming Braves fans performing that annoying Tomahawk Chop. The sound more likely was grumbling from Atlanta fans having to wait out an hour-long rain delay before watching their team lose to the Chicago Cubs.

The Cubbies, who are climbing back into the National League Central race, slapped the Braves 4-3.

Also on Monday, the Twins finished off the Yankees 4-2 just before a heavy rain zeroed in on Target Field. Twins’ closer Brandon Kintzler pitched a perfect ninth inning as rain began soaking the ballpark.

First-pitch temperature hit 88 degrees and may have caused some difficulty for Minnesota starter Aldaberto Mejia as he battled six innings effectively through the humid night.

“I was throwing hard overall,” the Dominican pitcher said. “I think the temperature got to me a little bit. Other than that, it was a good outing.”

 

Twins’ meteorologist Mace Michaels posted the above photo showing a soaked Target Field moments after the game. Michaels, by the way, is a great Twitter follow for all your Twins weather news and updates.

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Ray Caldwell sparks Indians to win over Philly

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caldwell-ray-locDark, ominous storm clouds rolled off Lake Erie and barreled toward League Park. Black sky

loomed over the ballyard, and rain, which had been falling lightly since the fourth inning,

threatened to become heavier.

The baseball game stirring underneath the clouds on this Sunday afternoon in downtown

Cleveland was nearly complete. The Indians led the visiting Philadelphia Athletics 2-1 in the top

of the ninth inning.

Ray Caldwell stood on the mound on this warm August day, pitching in his first game with the

Indians. The right hander retired the first two A’s batters as the storm above intensified.

Caldwell readied to pitch to the next to Athletics’ shortstop Joe Dugan when…

Boom!

A fearsome lightning bolt zipped from the overhanging clouds. Frightened spectators scurried for

cover.

“The bolts flashed here and there, causing much excitement,” Harry P. Edwards wrote in the

Sporting News days later. “There was a blinding flash that seemed to set the diamond on fire and

Caldwell was knocked flat from the shock of it.”

His teammates rushed in to check on the hurler, who, “lay stretched out in the pitcher’s box.”

Caldwell was down but not out. He did a quick inventory of his arms and legs. What a relief.

Everything was still attached.

The pitcher dusted off his pinstriped uniform, and readied to finish off Dugan and the A’s.

After the game, Caldwell told the Cleveland Press that the lightning strike “felt just like

somebody came up with a board and hit me on top of the head and knocked me down.”

***

Trailing the Chicago White Sox by eight games, Indians’ player-manager Tris Speaker refused

“to admit they were out of the pennant race.” The day before this matinee with last-place

Philadelphia, the Tribe had rolled off five wins in their last six games.

“They are fighting hard for every game and have been fairly successful despite the decidedly

erratic pitching the team has had,” The Sporting News claimed.

To boost the rotation, Cleveland picked up Caldwell, a fun-loving spitballer, whom the Red Sox

had released in early July.

Now weeks after the signing, Caldwell, on a day in which the Cleveland Plain Dealer had

forecasted “showers and cooler” temperatures, was pitching a masterful game in the debut for his

new team.

The Indians picked up their only two runs in the bottom of the fourth on a walk, a sacrifice, a

couple of ground outs and a throwing error by Dugan – but no hits.

The A’s scored a run in the fifth when George Burns crossed the plate on a Cy Perkins grounder.

Burns had reached base after being hit by a pitch.

Caldwell cruised through eight innings against the A’s, who had lost 13 of 14 games.

Into the ninth they went. The Athletics’ first two batters failed to reach base safely.

Then came the ruckus.

***

As Dugan stood at the plate, “Thousands of spectators were thrown into a momentary panic by

the bolt which came without warning and made as much noise as the back firing of a thousand

autos or the explosion of a dozen shells from a battery of big berthas,” the Cleveland Plain

Dealer reported the following day.

Caldwell’s teammates feared “he may have been killed,” Edwards wrote in the Sporting News,

“but he struggled to his feet, and after frisking himself to see if he was all there, pitched what

was left of the game, which was finished before the rain became a downpour.”

The lightning, the Cleveland Press reported, had knocked off Indians’ catcher Steve O’Neill’s

mask and hat, as well as Harry Davis’ navy blue A’s cap. Davis was coaching third base for

Philadelphia.

“We all could feel the tingle of the electric shock running through our systems, particularly in

our legs,” umpire Billy Evans said after the game.

Davis, the Press reported, “got a second shock, for Cy Perkins came up to feel Harry’s head and

see if he was hurt. The lightning had charged Davis’ hair with electricity and his whole frame

tingled when Cy touched him.”

Teammates also claimed to have felt an “electrical current” from lightning hitting the metal

spikes on their shoes.

“One of the players touched Caldwell on the head and leaped into the air. He said the pitcher

seemed to be crackling with electricity,” a reporter wrote in a wire story.

Is this possible?

“When lightning strikes the ground, the current flows across the surface creating a step voltage.

Someone standing with their feet apart can have current go up one leg and down the other,” said

Joseph Dwyer, a lightning researcher and professor of physics at the University of New

Hampshire. “I would think such a large current through the legs could explain the numbness

afterwards.”

One Cleveland player who complained of numbness was Ray Chapman, who nearly a year later

was killed after being hit by a pitch thrown from Yankees’ hurler Carl Mays. Running to

Caldwell, Chapman nearly fell from the numb feeling in his leg.

The lightning event was quiet frightful for the spectators.

Newspaper reports say lighting danced along the ballpark rails near where some fans were sitting

and jumped toward the pitcher’s mound.

“Lightning certainly can travel along metal railing,” Dwyer said, a phenomenon he called side

flashes.

“When lightning strikes, there is often tens of thousands of amps of current and very large

voltages,” the professor said. “If some of this current goes into a metal conductor such as fences

or railings, the current can travel long distances, causing sparks to other objects along the way.”

Even pitchers.

***

There still was one more out to go.

Still shocked, figuratively and possibly literally, from the turn of events, players took their

positions. Caldwell pitched to Dugan and “forced him to hit a grounder to Gardner just as the

clouds broke and the rain came down heavily,” wrote the Plain Dealer.

Game over. Indians 2, Athletics 1.

Caldwell pitched a complete game and allowed Philadelphia only one run and four hits. He

struck out three and walked two.

Afterward, Caldwell assessed the damage and found he had slight burns on his chest. Speculation

at the time concluded lightning had hit the metal button on his cap, “surged through his body,

and exited through his metal spikes.”

This, like a direct strike on a person, is unlikely, said Dr. Mary Ann Cooper, founding director of

the African Centres for Lightning and Electromagnetics and professor emerita at the University

of Illinois at Chicago.

“Lightning only goes through the body for perhaps three-to- four microseconds before it flashes

over the outside, and that’s not long enough to cause internal burns,” Dr. Cooper said. “It would

be nice to know what the chest burns looked like. Was there a linear burn down the middle or

sides of the chest where there would be sweat lines that lightning turned into steam causing

burns? Was it where metal was? Did he have a necklace with a cross on it, so that there was a

cross shape burned in?”

Dr. Cooper also wondered if the burns could have been fern-like, or Lichtenberg figures.

***

Caldwell recovered and Cleveland’s win meant the Indians kept pace and remained eight games

behind the American League-leading Chicago White Sox, who had also won that day, 4-1, over

the New York Yankees.

The Indians put together a run through the season’s remaining weeks, including a mid-September

streak of 12 wins in 13 games that began with Caldwell pitching a 3-0 no-hitter against the

Yankees, one of his former teams. However, Cleveland finished three and a half games behind

the White Sox, who went on to infamously represent the American League in the 1919 World

Series.

Caldwell’s electrifying performance helped spark the Indians’ late-season run. In six games with

his new club, the big righty pitched to a 5-1 record with a 1.71 ERA, proving the Indians had

made the right move in giving the pitcher, who was 31 years old at the time, another chance to

prove himself.

“When Speaker announced he was going to give Ray Caldwell a trial in the box, lots of persons

thought he was crazy,” wrote the Sporting News on Sept. 4, 1919. “But Speaker now has the last

laugh on the doubters, for Caldwell turned in and beat the Athletics easily and then all but beat

the White Sox, finally being trounced by them in the ninth inning, 3 to 2, not bad pitching for a

pitcher thought to be through as a big leaguer.”

Struck down, but not out

Posted on

caldwell-newspaperRemember the one about Cleveland Indians pitcher Ray Caldwell getting struck by lightning?

He was standing on the mound, needing one more out to finish the game when…

BOOM!

Caldwell and the Indians were leading the visiting Philadelphia Athletics 2-1 on a warm August day when a storm rolled off Lake Erie and approached League Park. As rain fell, Caldwell quickly recorded two outs on the A’s and was facing Joe Dugan when lightning flashed down on the ballpark.

It sent spectators scurrying for safety. It put Caldwell on his keister.

“It felt just like somebody came up with a board and hit me on the head and knocked me down,” Caldwell told the Cleveland Press after the game.

Some accounts say the lightning bolt knocked Caldwell out for five minutes. Other reports say the pitcher got up, brushed himself off and recorded the last out. It seems the latter is the more prevalent story.

Players rushed to Caldwell’s aid. Some, such as teammate Ray Chapman, said they felt the “juice” run through their bodies.

When I first began delving into the details of this game back in the spring – I’m writing a story about the contest for the SABR Games Project – I emailed lightning researcher Joseph Dwyer, asking for his thoughts about the players’ claim of felling lightning in their bodies and the subsequent numbness.

“When lightning strikes the ground, the current flows across the surface creating a step voltage. Someone standing with their feet apart can have current go up one leg and down the other,” wrote Dwyer, a professor of physics at the University of New Hampshire. “I would think such a large current through the legs could explain the numbness afterwards.”

One of the players who complained of numbness was Chapman, who nearly a year later was killed after being hit by a pitch thrown from Yankees hurler Carl Mays.

Newspaper reports say lighting danced along the rails of the ballpark.

“Lightning certainly can travel along metal railing,” Dwyer said, a phenomenon he called side flashes.

“When lightning strikes, there is often tens of thousands of amps of current and very large voltages,” the professor said. “If some of this current goes into a metal conductor such as fences or railings, the current can travel long distances, causing sparks to other objects along the way.”

One interesting side note from newspaper accounts says that Indians’ catcher Steve O’Neill tossed his metal mask as far away as possible to avoid being struck by subsequent bolts.

I asked Dwyer if O’Neill’s mask toss was a necessary move.

“It is a very good idea to take lightning seriously, but the approach was wrong,” Dwyer wrote. “The only way to be relatively safe from lightening is to go inside an enclosed structure like a house or a building.”

But “not a dugout,” Dwyer stressed.

***

Speaking of the SABR (Society for American Baseball Research) Games Project, I recently had story published there about Joe DiMaggio tying the Yankees’ consecutive game hitting streak at 29. It happened on June 16, 1941 when DiMaggio lined a double to left field shortly after rain had delayed the contest for more than an hour at Yankee Stadium. (Of course rain was involved, right?)

You can read my story here. Plus, there are tons of other extensively researched, well-written essays by numerous SABR members posted on the Games Project website.

Just like we drew it up

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I made a silly prediction earlier today that Game 7 of the World Series would go 13 innings and have a brief rain delay in the 11th. I missed it by one inning. The delay came just as the 10th was about to begin.

Update: The tarp has been rolled off the field and we’re back to baseball.

What a game!!!

Fall Classic Savings Time

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Good news for those of us who have become somewhat sleep deprived during the Major League Baseball playoffs: Tonight’s World Series Game Two start time has been moved up one hour to 7:08 p.m.

Now the bad news: The change was made because of a threat of rain tonight in Cleveland. According to forecasts, rain is expected in the city this afternoon before tapering off.

The chance of precipitation is around 35 percent at 8 p.m. and increases to 50-55 percent in the next couple of hours. At 11 p.m., the chance of precipitation jumps to about 80 percent and 90 at midnight.

Look out if the game goes into extra innings.

The last time a World Series game was suspended for weather was Game 5 in 2008 when rain drenched Philadelphia’s Citizens Bank Park. The Phillies and Rays were tied at 2-2 in the bottom of the sixth when the Monday night game was called. It was resumed two days later.

Cubs manager Joe Maddon was skipper of the Rays, who lost to the Phillies in five games.

Cold temperatures could also be a factor in tonight’s contest at Progressive Field. Game-time temps are expected to be in the high 40s with a wind chill of around 42 degrees. In the opener, in which Cleveland won 6-0, temperatures hung around 50 degrees.

Everyone has to deal with the cold, but a lot of eyes will be on Cubs’ starter Jake Arrieta. You may remember Arrieta’s velocity dipped a bit last October as he struggled in Game 2 of the 2015 NLCS on a 45-degree night in a 4-1 loss to the Mets. Many believe the cold played a role in right hander’s struggles.

The Indians last played in the World Series in 1997 against the Marlins. The games in Florida were nice weather-wise, but Game 4 in Cleveland had a game-time temperature of 41, which dropped to the mid-30s throughout the contest.

But tonight, our biggest concern is rain… and for me, getting to bed at a decent time. So, the hour-earlier start time is just dandy. Tribe manager Terry Francona does mind either.

“Shoot, it just means we start an hour earlier. We can handle that,” Francona said. “I don’t care what time they tell us to play. I’m sure they have good reason. If it’s supposed to rain late, I don’t really have a reaction. I’m going to be here anyway by 10 (a.m.) So it doesn’t really matter.”

So this is Opening Day?

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IndiansSnow-4-8-2016When I think of Major League Baseball’s Opening Day, I conjure images of a warm, sunny day at the ballpark.

Thoughts of baseball = thoughts of summer weather.

I’m sure I’m not the only one who falls victim to automatically summer-izing the games played in the first couple of weeks of the season, even though those contests are played in April. I think it still surprises most us when we tune into season openers and see snow flying and fans bundled up like its January.

Since the season began, the Cleveland Indians have had a miserable time with the weather. Two of their first four scheduled games were postponed. First, it was snow flurries and bone-rattling temperatures on April 4, the scheduled Opening Day, at Progressive Field. It was rain three days later, causing the team’s second postponement of young season.

In between, the Indians hosted the Red Sox Tuesday when it was 34 degrees in Cleveland. That’s the coldest temperatures have dipped for an Opening Day game in the franchise’s long history.

Bad weather struck again on Wednesday; a cold rain delayed the first pitch by 12 minutes.

The Indians trekked to Chicago Friday, April 8, to face the White Sox, and the bad weather tagged along. It was 39 degrees with snow flurries at U.S. Cellular Field when Chance the Rapper tossed out the ceremonial first pitch. The actual first pitch from Chicago’s John Danks was delayed 20 minutes.

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Don’t believe me? Heidi Watney has the graphics to prove it.

On Saturday, there was no rain or sleet or snow around the ballpark. It was merely cold, 32 degrees. No big deal.

However, rain fell Sunday, postponing the Sox-Tribe matinee.

It had to be a welcome change Tuesday when the Indians played the Tampa Bay Rays inside the cozy comforts of the 71-degree Tropicana Field. As Paul Hoynes notes on Cleveland.com, that was a solid 37 degrees warmer than the Tribe’s first game of the season.

Sure, the Trop is an eyesore and Cleveland suffered a lopsided 5-1 loss, but at least they got play baseball in what likely felt like the opening temperatures we summon in our minds.

 

Coming up next on The Rainout Blog: A guy walks into a bar an Olive Garden